Author: tine263

I love drive-in theaters ... open, closed, or abandoned! I also have a high interest in things abandoned (in general), prisons (old ones!), and cemeteries.

Shore Drive-In (Closed, MD)

Our Visit (November 2014):

We love to take day-trips and have surprise date days. One of these took us to Assateague Island State Park and Ocean City, Maryland. As always, I saw an opportunity to visit an abandoned drive-in! In this case it was Ocean City’s Shore Drive-In Theatre, a couple miles off the island.

 

There was a bit of traffic, but we knew the general area of the marquee. After we parked an got out on foot to explore, I couldn’t help but think about the tourists visiting Ocean City. Hundreds – maybe more – passed the marquee covered in tangled weeds and plants without a second glance.

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Red, green, and white stripes were still visible along the 2 sides of the marquee, but the rest was mere rusted metal. Where words once announced the featured films, only bars remained. Looking underneath, you can see the wires and connections that once held bright white lights to illuminate the marquee.

 

Beyond the marquee there was so much more to be seen! Even after almost 40 years, nature, the elements, and vandals could not completely destroy visible remnants of the drive-in.

Various building pieces remained – a wooden structure that lay crumbled on its side, the ticket booth, speaker poles with torn bases, and the screen. The screen is always my favorite piece of a drive-in that has been left behind. Their resilience amazes me.

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The screen held a large lattice of wooden pieces as the backing. Larger slats of wood lay across the lattice horizontally where the movies once shone. Vines and trees intertwined with the lattice. My favorite piece of the screen was the ladder in the back, against one of the wooden poles, leading to the screen.

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Everything was very overgrown, but it was manageable to navigate. As always – be careful, be considerate, and do not leave any physical imprint.

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History:

The Shore Drive-In Theatre opened in 1954 and lasted for 22 years, closing in 1976. The Salisbury Times has advertisements starting in 1954 through ’76. In March of 1956, the Baltimore Sun reported that the court ruled the drive-in must be closed on Sundays.

 

Besides this bit of information, I could not find the owners/operators of the theatre, why it closed, or the types of movies it ran. Several people online reported that there was a flea market on the property after it closed. The property is currently for sale as a commercial property, listed for $800,000.

 

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Shore Drive-In:                                                         11906 Ocean Gateway, Ocean City, MD 21842

 

 

Boulevard Drive-In (Allentown, PA) – Closed

Our Visit (2014):

On one of our day road trips we wound up in Allentown area. Per usual, I decided to check up on any possible drive-in remains and found the former Boulevard Drive-In! It was easy to find – driving along Union Boulevard you could see the screen set back, facing the boulevard. After another drive-by we found a spot to pull over.

 

It was apparent that construction was under way, but at the time we didn’t know the purpose. There were various tractors, construction fencing, and wooden markers for the paving that was underway. A beautiful new building was set in the back-center of the lot, and some paving was started around the building, and circling towards the drive-in screen.

That’s right – the drive-in screen! It was still standing tall, even with some minor damage. As we left I was just hoping that the new construction would keep the screen in the design.

History:

The Boulevard Drive-In opened on October 19, 1949. Owned and operated by Milgram Theaters, the Boulevard paved the way for all drive-ins!

 

In 1950 David Milgram brought a suit against the 8 major film companies because they would not grant access for first-run films to drive-ins. Two of the companies, RKO and Fox, offered second-run films (28 days after the indoor cinemas had the films), but Milgram was not satisfied. In a Philadelphia court, Milgram won the suit. The film companies appealed twice, including to the US Supreme Court in May 1952, but they refused to hear the appeal.

 

In 1950, the drive-in worked with Station WAAB to include live shows as entertainment at the drive-in. In May of that year, the Sleepy Hollow Ranch Gang had two scheduled performances. According to Wikipedia, the drive-in also had a children’s play area in front of the screen with various playground equipment.

 

The drive-in had many prosperous years, but closed in the 1980s. I was unable to find an exact date, but one user posted on cinematreasures.org that they remember attending in 1984. For photos from 1988 – including the marquee, screen, ticket booths, and projection booth visit http://www.cinematour.com/tour/us/13063.html.

 

The drive-in has since been converted to a class car showcase. Known as the Allentown Class Motor Car showcase, it is owned by Nicola Bulgari. This jeweler wanted to have a place to show and drive his classic cars. Visit Here for details from the architect.

 

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Boulevard Drive-In

556 Union Boulevard

Allentown, PA

 

 

 

Shore Drive-In (Closed, NJ)

Our Visit: January 2014

On a day off in January 2014, Dan and I took a road trip north to try and find a few drive-ins. Our luck was high, because we were able to visit 2 former drive-in sites. The Shore Drive-In and Fly-In Drive-In were 4.4 miles apart on Rt. 34 in Wall Township.

The downfall of our visit was that it had snowed prior to our visit, making it difficult to capture pictures of what remained for the Shore Drive-In. The site is not easily accessible, especially in the snow.

There are many speaker poles remaining, outlining the parking spaces and lanes for driving.

In addition to the speaker poles, there were two building remains. It is hard to ascertain the buildings’ purposes from my memory (2 years ago!) and the snow. I believe the red bricks were from the projection booth. The other I am not so sure…

History:

On May 12, 1948, the Shore Drive-In of Farmingdale*, NJ opened with the support and praise of various local businesses and residents. The Asbury Park Press newspaper (May 11, 1948) is littered with advertisements congratulating the Eastern Drive In Theatre Corporation on the opening of the Shore Drive-In. Supporters included Bell Supply Co, Drive-In Refreshments, Thomas Nicol Co, Jersey State Electric, Franklin Engineering, Monmouth Lumber Co, Anchor Post Fence Co, and many more.

 

Most notable was the support and recognition from the Park-In Theatre Company. The Park-In Theatre Company was Hollinghead’s company, the original creator of the Drive-In Theater. The Shore Drive-In was covered and license under the Hollingshead Patent for drive-ins.

 

Some interesting features for this drive-in included complementary bottle warming for mothers with young babies, in addition to the usual amenities offered by drive-ins.

 

Research of Eastern Drive In Theatre Corporation and James J. Thompson (owner) led to very little, except that they owned and operated several other NJ drive-ins including the Union DI (where the original moved after 3 years), Morris Plains DI and Totowa DI. However, the corporation and drive-in search did connect to Wilfred P. Smith.

 

Wilfred P. Smith was the general manager for Eastern Drive-In Corporation through 1950, having a hand in all of the beginning drive-ins in New Jersey, including the Shore Drive-In. He obviously took pride in the presentation and reputation of the drive-in, for he is quoted saying they were “striving for another NJ State Garden Club award such as was presented to our Union Drive-In Theater last year for landscaping, beauty, safety and civic achievement for a business enterprise along a main highway” (Asbury Park Press, 1948).

 

Smith left Eastern Drive-In Corporation to open his own drive-in in Ledgewood, and subsequently the Newton Drive-In. Although I was unable to find a lot of history on the Shore Drive-In, I was excited to be introduced to Wilfred P. Smith and his pioneering efforts. Hopefully he enjoyed the retired life, and his memory will live on in the drive-in world.

 

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Shore Drive-In, 5001 New Jersey 33, Wall Township, NJ 07727

The Shore Drive-In closed sometime after 1979. The screen was demolished in 2001.

Some more great photos: http://drive-ins.com/gallery/njtshor/shore-drive-in-theater-farmingdale-nj

*Depending on where you get your information, the Shore Drive-In may be listed as Collingwood Park, Wall Township, or Farmingdale. It was near Asbury Park, but not in that town.

 

Point 3 Drive-In (Open, PA)

Our Visit (September 21, 2015):

This was our first drive-in theater where we were allowed to, and brought!, our dog, Max! Needless to say, I was excited about his aspect right from the start. I had seen photos of drive-ins with tail-wagging dogs in the background, but had yet to experience this side of the drive-in. We made a night of our trip – visiting Centralia, PA to explore a Weird Pennsylvania article location, drove by the Laurel Drive-In in Hazleton, PA (post to come eventually – we went there the previous year!), and went to the Point 3 Drive-In.

We arrived early so I could take photos of the outside pieces – marquee, back of the main screen, drive-way…the usual. The Point 3 has old ticket booths at the tree border, marking the entrance. The ticket booths are no longer used, but serve a taste of nostalgia. As you pass through the ticket booths (overhand present!), the block of pine trees to your left clear out to expose the expansive drive-in.

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Following the drive-way, cars approach the back end of the snack bar. This serves as the ticket booth, advertised by a neon sign. Our screen (#3) was to our far right. Both Screen 2 and 3 lots are covered in grass. When we first came in, I wondered about parking for the movie. Lanes nor spacers were marked – only the slight incline for optimal viewing indicated the parking locations. I needn’t worry – my husband chose a perfect spot, and it was not overly crowded (yes…a wedding over the summer kept me away from blogging!).

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Max and I explored the grounds while Dan set up the back of the jeep with the blankets, pillows, etc. Max was drawn towards the snack-bar (of course), but no dogs allowed inside. We saw an elevated seating area, with overhead coverage, next to the snack bar, and some picnic benches on the other side. There was a slide and play-set to the left of Screen 1, which is always neat to see (I think it really shows the focus on children and families!).

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Our food was good – typical snack-bar snacks. The soda was self-serve, a first I had seen at a drive-in. Our movies were good – “Pixels” and “Trainwreck” – the adult movie set out of the three screen choices. Most cars left after “Pixels,” but then again, most of the cars had children.

All in all, it was a fun evening and we were glad to be there for their last night of the season!

 

History:

The Point 3 Drive-In was originally called the Arrow Drive-In Theatre, opening between 1952 and 1953 in Danville, Pennsylvania. According to Billboard (June 21, 1952), the drive-in opened in summer of 1952. Harold E. Bell opened the drive-in with the help of Allied Booking and Buying Service. By September 13, 1952, Billboard reported that new lamps were installed at the drive-in. By May 30, 1953, Bell resigned from his other theater management position at College Theater in Bethlehem to manage the Arrow Drive-In. Bell seemed to have been a theater advocate, being a manager of regular Berwick theaters up until 1950, and also a salesman of Perkins Theatre Supply Co from 1952-55.

The name change timeframe is uncertain, occurring sometime between 1955 and 1958. The Theatre Catalog lists the drive-in as the Arrow Drive-In in 1955, and the Film Daily Year Book of Motion Pictures lists the drive-in as the Point Drive-In in 1958. While running under the name of Arrow Drive-In, the theater had one screen. This continued through 1966 at least (via Historic Aerials). By 1993, historic aerials seems to show 3 screens.

David Renn is the current owner and has been for the past 27 years (Renn, in person, 9/21/2015). Prior to Renn it seems that Cinecom Theatre ran the Point, after Comerford Theaters was in charge and sold out to them in the late 1960s. Looking into these theater companies does not bring out any connections to the drive-in, although they are associated with local theaters.

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Point 3 Drive-In Theatre Route 11 & Northumberland-Da Hwy Danville, PA 17821

 

Pennsauken Drive-In (Closed, NJ)

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History:

The Pennsauken Drive-In Theatre opened between 1965-1967 (historic aerials do not have the drive-in shown in 1965, but it is there for 1967). Built by the Fox family of Fox Theatre Company out of Philadelphia, the same company that also built the Bridgeton DI, Wildwood DI, Super 130 DI, among a few in Pennsylvania as well.

 

Budco, another big name in theaters at the time, managed the Pennsauken Drive-In. In 1977, the state sued Budco for showing murder and nudity on screen (which could be seen from the highway).

 

As with many other drive-ins, it has been difficult to locate the exact year the Pennsauken DI stopped operating. News clippings show that the theatre was still running in 1980. However, a January 8, 1987 article from philly.com shows that AMC was planning on building an indoor cinema on the site, indicating the drive-in had been closed.

 

 

My Visit – 1/21/13

The Pennsauken Drive-In Theatre is one of the former drive-ins that you can see today – very easily! The screen and lot are wide-open and can be seen while driving on Rt. 73 in New Jersey. The back of the screen can also be seen on Rt. 90 right before/after the Betsy Ross Bridge.

 

When we took photos and visited the site, it was easy to navigate. Besides around the screen, the lot is not overgrown like most abandoned drive-ins. We parked in the church’s lot and walked over. At the end of the parking lot were a couple old poles and outlets from the drive-in time period.

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Standing at the back of the drive-in, you can easily see how the gravel forms the lanes to drive to the parking spots.

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It was hard to tell, and writing this 2 years after the fact of visiting, it is hard to remember exactly the location and purpose of the remains in my photos. One section of ground remains for the projection booth (center of the lot) and another section remains from the concession stand (center, back of lot).

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Projection Booth (Center of Lot)

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Concession Stand (Back Center of Lot)

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Part is most likely bathroom tile…

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…and other could be flooring for various areas in the concession stand and/or projection booth. There is cement, red tile, and tile imprints on the ground and cement. I thought it would be relatively easy to locate the company that made the tiles since I found information printed on the back; however, I could not determine the maker.

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Trees surround the screen, but none have left damage. There are rust stains on the boards that make up the screen, and metal bars support it from behind.

 

 

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There were two tall lights, as well, on the drive-in lot. I’m not sure of the purpose, except as a light for the end of the movie.

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Sources:

 

Pennsauken Drive-In 2323 New Jersey 73 Pennsauken, NJ

Pennsauken Drive-In
2323 New Jersey 73
Pennsauken, NJ

Fly-In Drive-In Theater (Wall Township, NJ) – Closed

History:

Fifteen years after the first drive-in theater, Edward Brown decided to take things to the next level. On June 3, 1948, in Wall Township, NJ, the first-ever Fly-In Drive-In Theatre opened to cars and planes. That’s right, both cars and planes were able to enjoy this outdoor movie theater.

Ed Brown operated an airport on the same property and would allow about 15-25 planes (accounts vary) to taxi to the back of the theater grounds. To return to the landing strip, a Jeep would tow the planes.

Ed Brown seemed like a firecracker, as well as a major businessman, community leader, and innovator. Ed Brown purchased the land in 1938 and bulldozed everything with a WWI tank. Besides the airport and fly-in drive-in theater, the land also included a quarry, golf range, amusement park, playground…

If you are searching for information on this drive-in theater, many addresses many yield results: Allenwood, Belmar, Farmingdale, Asbury Park, Wall Township, Neptune Township. The first four towns are part of what is now Wall Township, and Neptune Township is next door. In “Drive-In Theaters: A History from their Inception in 1933,” Kerry Seagrave has Belmar as a separate fly-in drive-in theatre, but many public comments and other articles make them one in the same.

I have been unable to find a closing date for the drive-in. 1953 Historical Aerials shows the drive-in, and in 1963 it still looks “alive.” However, the next option, 1970, it is clearly no longer in use.

In 2006, Ed Brown passed away. The airport and surrounding land is now Monmouth Executive Airport.

Our Visit:

There were many spots to take photos, including the former ticket booth, concession stand and projection booth, as well as the base of the screen.

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Wall Township Fly In Drive In

Fly-In Drive-In 1675 New Jersey 34 Wall Township, NJ 07727

Besides the Seagrave book, these two articles were helpful and interesting:

Absecon Drive-In (Closed)

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The Absecon Drive-In is one of the reasons I will drive the White Horse Pike all the way to Atlantic City instead of taking the AC Expressway. Driving by the partial screen makes me smile (and often slow down a bit) every time.

 

History:

The Walter Reade Theater Company built the Absecon Drive-In. They were a big theater company in and around New Jersey, building both indoor cinemas and drive-ins. Originally based out of Asbury Park, NJ, Walter Reade, followed by his son Walter Reade, Jr., opened the Absecon Drive-In in 1955. The historic aerials offers a neat view from 1957. According to Billboard Magazine (April 1955), the Absecon Drive-In was set to open on Decoration Day (http://books.google.com/books?id=BhwEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA73&lpg=PA73&dq=absecon+drive-in+theater+1955&source=bl&ots=T31dXFofJR&sig=9NAR-gFmjD4oa37LwIjhGW7lASY&hl=en&sa=X&ei=OTY7VP7gCNeiyAT68oJA&ved=0CEAQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=absecon%20drive-in%20theater%201955&f=false)…although “Decoration Day” is not a holiday I’m familiar with, nor could I figure out what it celebrated!

 

In 1964 Frank Theaters purchased the Absecon Drive-In (Source: email with Bruce Frank, CEO of Frank Theaters). Mr. Frank said that the screen is made of masonry board and was painted white.

 

Several online sources state that Milgram Theaters owned the Absecon Drive-in in 1964. I will stick with my statement that Frank Theaters owned the drive-in: 1. Bruce Frank is my source. 2. Milgram theaters was locally based, but connected with Fox Theaters (not Walter Reade or the Franks).

 

The theater closed in 1983, according to public comments online.

 

My Experience (1/5/2013):

The Absecon Drive-In is directly off Route 30, aka the White Horse Pike. We parked at the gate that blocks the entrance road and snapped some photos from afar. I did not want to risk being questioned by authority, nor trek out through the weeds. Even though it is used as a storage site, numerous people have taken photos close, and it was once a drive-in, the area behind is a marsh (wetlands). I’d rather not sink!

 

Unfortunately my idea for the blog did not occur early enough for me to get photos pre- Hurricane Sandy. The screen suffered severe damage after the hurricane.

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While driving by…. going away from Atlantic City.

 

 

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If you ever take the Atlantic City Line for NJ Transit you can also see the screen from the other side. That was neat to see a different view (and at a high speed).

Google Maps 2014

Absecon Drive-In 421 E. Absecon Blvd. Absecon, NJ

 

 

White Horse Down

The iconic white horse, which stood atop a tall tower has fallen down. The only remainder of the White Horse Pike Drive in has found its demise after a brief storm hit New Jersey last night.
For the past several days and I have been checking its direction to see if the horse spun/turned. There had been a comment on the blog asking about its movement. So tonight, on our way home, I asked Dan to tell me its direction. His response: it’s not there.

Please excuse the bad quality of pictures, I did not anticipate needing to take photos tonight. His rear legs are not attached anymore… that is the piece on the left side.  He is currently next to the tower,  in the Petsmart parking lot. So very sad….

7/26/14 UPDATE: The horse was taken down by crane. There was an article in the Courier Post today and a video on Facebook. Reason still unknown, but speculation lies in the possibility of harm with the rear legs falling.

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His leg is on the left side

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Inside

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The tower

Video to Support Drive-Ins!

Mod Betty (an awesome, retro-hunting blogger) has posted a kick-starter video to support the drive-ins! Check it out (featuring Shankweiler’s Drive-In!!).

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThEvPLYXnP4&feature=youtu.be

 

If you like the video, check out her page: http://retroroadmap.com/